Monthly Archives: May 2013

Light Weight

Our final roundup of Keha3 products, is Margus Triibmann’s Light Weight. Light Weight, is a lighting system that consists of an LED spotlight that hooks directly into the mains outlet, and various hooks and rods to mount the spotlight. The spotlights can easily be combined LEGO style to create custom lighting elements from simple hanging lights to chandeliers.

For more information about this this and other products, see Keha3’s 2013 product sheet.

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LED Streetlight

Keha3‘s Pavel Sidorenko, Tarmo Luisk, Margus Triibmann collborated on this led streetlight concept for LED Street. What I like about the design is how thin it is, while still looking like a modern streetlamp. What would normally be a reflector, is hinged rain cover to allow access to the lighting elements. According the LED Street site, the lighting element is replaceable and comes with different numbers of lighting strips in order to customize illumination and power usage.

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Sea Buoy

Margus Triibmann of the Estonian design studio Keha3, designed this LED lit buoy. Made of translucent polypropylene, the buoy comes a 15 meter waterproof cable. The accompanying documentation helpfully points out that by placing the buoy on land, the buoy can be used as a decorative hanging lamp or as a floor lamp when provided with an appropriate stand.

Forbidden Zones

Slate’s Vault highlights a 1955 map of forbidden areas for Soviet travelers. Like all good things from the Cold War, it’s born out the absurdity, childish tit-for-tat, and fear.

In 1952, the US passed a law baring pinkos from entering the country. The next year, the Soviets decided to how much better they were by letting capitalist pig dogs into the 70% of Soviet Union. So in 1955, the US decided to mimic the Soviet travel restrictions by opening up 70% of the US and 70% of cities of population greater than 100,000 to the Soviets. Ports and military installations were forbidden, but must of it is just arbitrary nonsense. You can visit Minneapolis, but not St. Paul. KCK is fine, but KCMO is not. Also, don’t even think about leaving Kansas City, Kansas. Texas Panhandle? Not a chance. And don’t even think about visiting Southern Illinois.

It’s just stupid.

This map held until Kennedy removed all travel restrictions in 1962.